Report Wire - Villagers lower by hill in Koraput to construct street
December 6, 2022

Report Wire

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Villagers lower by hill in Koraput to construct street

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By PTI

KORAPUT: The poor tribal residents of Ghantraguda in Koraput might not have heard of the ‘Mountain Man’ Dashrath Manjhi, however like him took up the work of developing a street slicing by the hills on their very own to handle their connectivity issues.

The villagers – women and men lower by a hill and cleared shrubs and have constructed a 6 km lengthy kuchha street connecting Ghantraguda with Puki Chhack within the district.

Ghantraguda is positioned about 35 km from Koraput city in southern Odisha and the diversion because of the lack of street made the villagers journey 52 km to achieve it.

They have been pressured to take a detour to achieve the headquarter city for varied works and infrequently confronted issues.

The street constructed by the villagers will cut back the space by 20 km, mentioned Lachna Purasethi, a villager.

The requests to the authorities involved for a shorter street had not helped issues.

“We appealed to the authorities for the road many times, but to no avail. Therefore, we decided to construct the road on our own,” mentioned Lochan Bisoi, a villager.

Armed with farm instruments just like the hoe, sickle, machete and the spade began, the poor tribal villagers started carving out the hill, he mentioned.

“In the absence of direct roads we face much difficulty in reaching Koraput town, specially in the nights and more so during the rainy season. Shifting patients to the hospital at Koraput becomes a nightmare and only God knows how we manage it,” he mentioned.

The villagers mentioned a steel street was constructed by the administration about 15 years again however there is no such thing as a signal of it now resulting from lack of upkeep.

The street constructed by them will assist round 4000 residents of a minimum of 9 villages, aside from Ghantraguda, on completion, they claimed.

“The village has been included in the rural connectivity programme and a pucca road will be constructed soon,” mentioned Damburudhar Mallick, the block growth officer of Dasmantpur, beneath which Ghantraguda falls.

Dashrath Manjhi was an agricultural labourer of Gehlaur village, close to Gaya in Bihar.

In 1959 his spouse died reportedly resulting from damage after she fell from a mountain and he couldn’t take her to the hospital within the city, 90 km away in time due to lack of roads.

A distraught however decided Manjhi later started to carve a path 110 m lengthy (360 ft), 9.1 m (30 ft) vast and seven.7 m (25 ft) deep by a ridge of hills utilizing solely a hammer and a chisel.

After 22 years of labor, Dashrath shortened journey between the Atri and Wazirganj blocks of Gaya district from 55 km to fifteen km.

KORAPUT: The poor tribal residents of Ghantraguda in Koraput might not have heard of the ‘Mountain Man’ Dashrath Manjhi, however like him took up the work of developing a street slicing by the hills on their very own to handle their connectivity issues.

The villagers – women and men lower by a hill and cleared shrubs and have constructed a 6 km lengthy kuchha street connecting Ghantraguda with Puki Chhack within the district.

Ghantraguda is positioned about 35 km from Koraput city in southern Odisha and the diversion because of the lack of street made the villagers journey 52 km to achieve it.

They have been pressured to take a detour to achieve the headquarter city for varied works and infrequently confronted issues.

The street constructed by the villagers will cut back the space by 20 km, mentioned Lachna Purasethi, a villager.

The requests to the authorities involved for a shorter street had not helped issues.

“We appealed to the authorities for the road many times, but to no avail. Therefore, we decided to construct the road on our own,” mentioned Lochan Bisoi, a villager.

Armed with farm instruments just like the hoe, sickle, machete and the spade began, the poor tribal villagers started carving out the hill, he mentioned.

“In the absence of direct roads we face much difficulty in reaching Koraput town, specially in the nights and more so during the rainy season. Shifting patients to the hospital at Koraput becomes a nightmare and only God knows how we manage it,” he mentioned.

The villagers mentioned a steel street was constructed by the administration about 15 years again however there is no such thing as a signal of it now resulting from lack of upkeep.

The street constructed by them will assist round 4000 residents of a minimum of 9 villages, aside from Ghantraguda, on completion, they claimed.

“The village has been included in the rural connectivity programme and a pucca road will be constructed soon,” mentioned Damburudhar Mallick, the block growth officer of Dasmantpur, beneath which Ghantraguda falls.

Dashrath Manjhi was an agricultural labourer of Gehlaur village, close to Gaya in Bihar.

In 1959 his spouse died reportedly resulting from damage after she fell from a mountain and he couldn’t take her to the hospital within the city, 90 km away in time due to lack of roads.

A distraught however decided Manjhi later started to carve a path 110 m lengthy (360 ft), 9.1 m (30 ft) vast and seven.7 m (25 ft) deep by a ridge of hills utilizing solely a hammer and a chisel.

After 22 years of labor, Dashrath shortened journey between the Atri and Wazirganj blocks of Gaya district from 55 km to fifteen km.